Laughter with Cancer
Mar 19, 2017 09:32:30
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Laughter with Cancer
Mar 19, 2017 03:51:35

This time last year, I was invited to share my message of happiness with my lovely colleague Kelly Tsagournos.

The message still stays true to today.

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Laughter with Cancer
Mar 18, 2017 23:12:47

Optimism gives you the best view in the world

#optimism #hope #happy #positivity #positivequotes #quoteoftheday #silly #lol #laughter #laughterwithcancer #cancerawareness

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Laughter with Cancer
Mar 17, 2017 13:54:38

D635: CAN DEATH BE A FABULOUS THING?

Without sounding morbid, death is a topic close to cancer community. It shouldn’t be taboo to talk about it. After all, no one gets out of here alive. Honouring Lisa’s way of being open to talk about the good, bad and ugly of cancer. Honestly, I have had ‘holy craps’ moments after diagnosis. Never have I faced death so closely (especially when I went into ICU, twice ). Having a conversation with a friend about shopping around for hospice as if it was picking the next airbnb was a surreal experience. Being asked about how I want my funeral to be is a real question faced by cancer patients.

Today, I farewell a sarcoma rock star warrior.
Dedicating this to Lisa Maggil from Terminally Fabulous who is now eternally fabulous. If someone can rock fabulous in heaven, Lisa is the one.

I carry those who have passed close to my heart, remembering my sarcoma warriors @Zane Collier, Kristian Antonellos, Michael Lyon, John Martin, Tory Marvin, Gavan and their families.

May their spirits rest in peace.
No more pain at last.

May strength be with those who are left behind.

Love and hugs,
Nat xx

17.03.17

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Laughter with Cancer
Mar 17, 2017 06:50:34

Before I was diagnosed with cancer, my last visit to the hospital was 20 years ago.

Who would have thought the next 10 months post diagnosis turns hospital as my second home.

Some cancer patients do not require the treatment as an inpatient. For some lucky patients like me, my treatment requires being plugged into IV machine for 10 hours for 5 days.

I still remember the first night I was there. It was so unreal. My brain was buzzing with the stream of information that has been dumped on me. From knowing nothing about cancer to being educated everything about it. My body was exhausted in the end.

I was lucky that I had learned the trick to sleeping well and slowing down my racing thoughts.

I am really feeling it for my friends who are a light sleeper. Hospital isn’t exactly the quietest place to be. I don’t mind so much about the bed. It was the nurse that wakes me up every 4 hours that disrupts me the most haha.

My sleeping pattern has gone crazy. My body was used to wake up every 2-4 hours. It wasn’t until almost a year post treatment that I can have an uninterrupted sleep.

What has your experience been?

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